Category: Inspirational People



 

I think that many of the current heads of State in Africa will not be so helpful in the difficult years which are beginning from now.

I think that way because most of them have personal agendas which do not place the human lives ahead of their own interests. In the past, much help which was offered by other countries in times of famine, for example, were stolen by corrupt leading figures. And even if our leaders were not corrupt, the rest of the world is also going to endure economic and physical natural disasters over the next few years and won’t be able to help Africa much this time…

So, who is really going to lead the world through this crisis?

For all crises in Earth’s history, there are people who have been prepared for some time before the fact. Some people have been  born specifically at this time with a life plan to serve people  and see them through the crisis. Even right now, across the world there are scientists, public personalities, farmers, environmental activists and even some presidents who have become more outspoken in urging global action to counter climate change and help poor countries to cope with its varied impacts. You will find that each one of them can play their roles beautifully and each will offer something special, especially towards the changing of consciousness of the Earth’s people. The leaders of the future are ordinary people, not presidents of countries necessarily, because changes in consciousness should occur at every level of society and in many different areas, such as farming, science, social policy and definitely in terms of attitude. It is not enough for Africans to take a victim stance, and to complain that they did not benefit from industrialization but are paying the biggest price. Even though it is a fact, focusing on that aspect will only encourage anger instead of focusing one’s energy towards constructive changes to help the current situation. Placing blame is not the solution.

 Who are our future leaders? Are there any special trends amongst them? Do they have anything in common and how can we recognize them?

 The future leaders of  the world will be those who are not motivated by material gain, by fame or by power, but rather, they serve some ideal that is in support of nature in particular and who show great love for human beings. They will be easy to see because they will naturally float to the surface when the timing is right. Many, even most of them are going to be females who naturally have a more nurturing motherly instinct.

One woman who I have always thought of as someone who is playing such a special role,  is a lady from Kenya called Wangari Maathai – she is the founder of the Greenbelt Movement and she won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004.

The work she has done in the field of environmental sustainability is extremely important example of how people can survive in the future, by changing the way they use natural resources and by planting trees to replace on they use up. She is certainly a role model for Africa’s future and she has laid down a foundation and has been a female pioneer in male-dominated Africa, which will make the road a little easier for this new generation of Women to be accepted more easily by people.

 She represents many “firsts” for women in Africa. She was the first woman in central or eastern Africa to hold a Ph.D., the first woman head of a university department in Kenya, the first African woman to win the Nobel Prize in Peace… and more than that, she also served as national chairperson for the National Council of Women of Kenya.

I think it can’t be a coincidence that her area of interest is environmental matters, in this era where the Earth is fighting for its life against humans’ destructive influence….. it is her role to send the message about sustainability, especially to women who will be the leaders in terms of making the cultural changes necessary to live sustainably. It is mostly the women in Africa who do the farming, who gather the firewood and who prepare the food, so when the women make the changes in African society, there is the potential for the culture to  change very fast into a good direction.Her role as a leader to woman is exceptionally admirable because she warned that educated women should avoid becoming an elite, and instead, should do work for the planet. She has encouraged the woman to stay connected to the land and stresses to them that nobody can afford to separate themselves from the earth, because all humans have to eat and depend on the soil. She is a truly noble leader and is exactly the type of person I believe will lead the world through the next few difficult years

I heard that her former husband, whom she divorced in the 1980s, was said to have remarked that she was “too educated, too strong, too successful, too stubborn and too hard to control”.  🙂

Anyway, I respect her a lot and have sympathy for her poor husband^^

I guess she would have had to be all of those things to fulfill her mission! She is a special lady indeed.

Thank you Wangari Maathai! I love you!

 

 

“I don’t really know why I care so much. I just have something inside me that tells me that there is a problem, and I have got to do something about it. I think that is what I would call the God in me.

All of us have a God in us, and that God is the spirit that unites all life, everything that is on this planet. It must be this voice that is telling me to do something, and I am sure it’s the same voice that is speaking to everybody on this planet – at least everybody who seems to be concerned about the fate of the world, the fate of this planet.”

Wangari Maathai

 

 

 

 

 


 I would like to share the blog of someone who is making a real difference and who seems to view our changing culture in a way which makes sense to me: That our changing world is not a tragedy, but an opportunity.

In the following article, he explains his vision …: Why ‘Transition Culture’?

Rob Hopkins is the co-founder of Transition Town Totnes and of the Transition Network. He has many years experience in education, teaching permaculture and natural building, and set up the first 2 year full-time permaculture course in the world, at Kinsale Further Education College in Ireland, as well as co-ordinating the first eco-village development in Ireland to be granted planning permission.

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He is author of ‘Woodlands for West Cork!’, ‘Energy Descent Pathways’ and most recently ‘The Transition Handbook: from oil dependence to local resilience’, which has been published in a number of other languages, and which was voted the 5th most popular book taken on holiday by MPs during the summer of 2008.  He publishes http://www.transitionculture.org, recently voted ‘the 4th best green blog in the UK’(!). He is the winner of the 2008 Schumacher Award, an Ashoka Fellow, is a Fellow of the Post Carbon Institute, served 3 years as a Trustee of the Soil Association, and was named by the Independent as one of the UK’s top 100 environmentalists. He is the winner of the 2009 Observer Ethical Award for the Grassroots Campaigner category, and in December 2009 was voted the Energy Saving Trust/Guardian’s ‘Green Community Hero’.  He lectures and writes widely on peak oil and Transition, holds an MSc in Social Research and recently completed a PhD at the University of Plymouth entitled ‘Localisation and resilience at the local level: the case of Transition Town Totnes’. He lives in Devon and is a keen gardener.

Please have a look at his interesting blog: http://transitionculture.org/

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